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Research Articles

Gender Differences in Mental Toughness and Coping with Injury in Runners

Andrews P, Chen MA (2014) Gender Differences in Mental Toughness and Coping with Injury in Runners. J Athl Enhancement 3:6 doi:10.4172/2324-9080.1000183

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine differences in Mental Toughness (MT) and coping with injury between male and female runners at different levels of experience.478 runners were categorized into beginners (n=47), intermediate (n=294) and advanced (n=137). All participants had sustained an injury during their running career. The present study utilized Survey Monkey™, which is an online survey collection service. Participants completed two questionnaires – the Psychological performance inventory (PPI-A) which measured MT and the Coping Inventory for Competitive Sport (CICS), which measured task, distancing and disengagement coping strategies.

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The effect of an eyes-closed dance-specific training program on dynamic balance in elite pre-professional ballet dancers: a randomized controlled pilot study.

Hutt.K., Redding.E. (2014). The effect of an eyes-closed dance-specific training program on dynamic balance in elite pre-professional ballet dancers: a randomized controlled pilot study. Journal of Dance Medicine and Science, 18(1):3-11

Abstract

Visual conditions for a dancer vary greatly between theatrical performance environments and dance studios, and this variability may be detrimental to their dynamic balance performance, particularly under stage lighting. In order to maintain balance control, dancers reportedly rely heavily on visual input, yet those who rely more on proprioceptive strategies for balancing have been found to be more stable. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability of an eyes-closed, dance-specific training program to nurture in dancers proprioceptive mechanisms that may facilitate their dynamic balance control

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Profiling sports therapy students' preferred learning styles within a clinical education context

Profiling sports therapy students' preferred learning styles within a clinical education context
Christopher Holland, Claire D Mills

Abstract

The aim of this study was to report the learning style preferences of final year Sports Therapy students within the context of clinical education, with a further specific focus on differences between male and female learning styles. A total of n = 32 BSc. (Hons) Sports Therapy degree students ( x̄ ± s; age = 21.8 ± 4.8 years, male:female = 14:18) were recruited from the University of Gloucestershire whilst completing a 24 week clinical practice module. Data collection involved the Kolb learning style inventory (version 3.1) being administered to all participants with reference to their clinical practice experience. 

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Increased treatment durations lead to greater improvements in non-weight bearing dorsiflexion range of motion for asymptomatic individuals immediately following an anteroposterior grade IV mobilisation of the talus

Holland, C.J., Campbell, K. & Hutt, K. (2015). Increased treatment durations to greater improvements in non-weight bearing dorsiflexion range of motion for asymptomatic individuals immediately following an anteroposterior grade IV mobilisation of the talus. Manual Therapy, 20(4); 598-602
Faculty of Life Sciences and Computing, School of Human Sciences, London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London, N7 8DB, UK
Received: August 7, 2013; Received in revised form: February 5, 2015; Accepted: February 11, 2015; Published Online: February 19, 2015

Abstract

Manual therapy aims to minimise pain and restore joint mobility and function. Joint mobilisations are integral to these techniques, with anteroposterior (AP) talocrural joint mobilisations purported to increase dorsiflexion range of motion (DF-ROM). This study aimed to determine whether different treatment durations of single grade IV anteroposterior talocrural joint mobilisations elicit statistically significant differences in DF-ROM. Sixteen asymptomatic male football players (age = 27.1 ± 5.3 years) participated in the study. Non-weight bearing (NWB) and weight bearing (WB) DF-ROM was measured before and after 4 randomised treatment conditions: control treatment, 30 s, 1 min, 2 min. NWB DF-ROM was measured using a universal goniometer, and WB DF-ROM using the weight-bearing lunge test. A within-subjects design was employed so that all participants received each of the treatment conditions. A 4 × 4 balanced Latin square design and 1 week interval between sessions reduced any residual effects.

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